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Sense About Homeopathy Image

Sense About Homeopathy

Homeopathy is marketed as a safe and natural treatment for a range of conditions. It works on the principles that 'like cures like' and that the smaller the dose the more potent the cure. There is no scientific evidence for these principles and homeopathy has repeatedly been found to be no better than the placebo controls in clinical trials.

The belief that one is receiving a treatment will often bring relief. This placebo effect is poorly understood and continues to be studied by scientists. However the placebo effect is not only reason that homeopathy may appear to be effective. Spontaneous recovery and fluctuating symptoms, when coinciding with taking a pill, mean that recovery appears to be due to a treatment when there is actually no connection. These explanations, along with the placebo effect, should always be eliminated first, before a treatment can be assumed to be effective.

Document type: Sense About

Published: 1 September 2006

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